Message to all Gardeners!

 

Gardening Hints and Tips to save you from Pain

Tips to avoid back strain while working in the garden.

Gardening is a hobby that is enjoyed by a great many people across the globe. In fact, studies have shown that working in a garden for just a few minutes a day, has proven to reduce stress significantly. Taking the time to smell the roses is beneficial for all! Sadly, however, many people are forced to give up gardening, as they grow older. Having trouble moving, getting up and down, carrying tools, etc., easily discourages those who suffer problems with mobility. Should our twilight years strip of us of one of your favourite pastimes? Definitely not! Keep on reading, to learn some methods of saving time and saving your back (and other body parts) in the garden.

Back-related problems are the number one reason that people give for avoiding garden work, which is perfectly understandable. Many of us suffer problems with our back as we grow older and gardening can prove quite painful if not done correctly. Appropriate tools and a few simple shortcuts can make a surprisingly big difference to gardeners, young and old alike. Taking the time to plan ahead can restore gardening to the fun and fascinating hobby that it once was.

Planning ahead is the trick to smart gardening. Take a moment to think of what you plan to do out in the beds and then collect your tools ahead of time – it gets painfully frustrating, getting out in the garden and situating yourself, only to discover that you’ve left an important tool or package of seeds behind. If you’re using small hand-held tools, try putting the ones that you’ll need into a bucket so that they’re easier to carry. If working with larger tools, such as shovels and rakes, try storing them in a wheeled trash can, which enables you to simply roll your tools out to the garden with you.

Before you even begin gardening, try doing a few simple stretches. Remember that weeding and tending a garden is a form of exercise and that those short minutes spent stretching will help to avoid painful pulled muscles down the road. Furthermore, when you begin your gardening, remember to treat it as exercise and vary the different tasks that you do, so you aren’t performing the same repetitive motion, over and over. This will help to avoid sore or stiff muscles, the following day.

If you are working from a standing position, try and use tools with long handles, so you don’t have to hunch over. Additionally, you will want to ensure that you maintain good posture while you’re working. Don’t be afraid to stand with your feet spread slightly, providing more stability for your body, and keep your back straight. When shovelling, raking or using a hoe, keep your motions slow and smooth; avoid jerking or making any short, choppy movements.

We are always taught to lift with our legs and not our backs, but you should also remember that, when you bend, you should bend from the hips and not the waist. Be careful not to twist as you turn – this can lead to painful back injuries. If you need to do something that would require you to twist, take the extra time to reposition your feet and stabilize yourself, rather than twisting and risking injury.

If you have pre-existing back problems, planting in raised beds or elevated containers can help prevent back strain by eliminating the need to get down on one’s knees. If this is not an option and you do have to kneel, be sure to use a kneeling pad or a specially-built kneeler. Also plan ahead and ensure that you have a form of sturdy support to help you to get back up on your feet and, in the event of an emergency, ensure that you have a whistle or your cell phone with you, while you are working outside.

If you have overly strenuous tasks that need completing, ask family or friends for assistance. If not an option, place a job card up in one of the numerous Oxford University’s asking for a student to help you for a couple of hours on the weekend…..worth a try.

The most important thing to remember, as you go out to work in your garden is to pace yourself. Don’t try to do too many things at once, if you need a break be sure to take one – our bodies ache and hurt as a way of telling us that something is wrong. “Be sure to listen to what yours is saying”!

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Stress Awareness Day

The modern world is becoming increasingly complex, and the demands on our time and attention are many. Our jobs are also more complex, and the business world has become more competitive. With the industrial age came helpful machines and increased productivity, but it also brought us the jackhammer, the loudspeaker, the motorcycle and car, and innumerable noisy machines. Physical stresses such as sound, air and water pollution have worsened over the last century, especially in the United States. We are also, because of electronic media and the Internet, aware of troubles and tragedies around the world that previous generations would never have known about, creating anxiety. Taken together, these assaults on our senses create a physical and emotional reaction.

The word for this overwhelming feeling is stress. It’s a term borrowed from the field of engineering, in reference to physical forces upon mechanical structures. The term was first used in its modern medical sense around the turn of the 20th century by Walter Cannon, a Harvard physiologist. Cannon also first described the “fight or flight” syndrome, and noted the damaging physical effects of a continuous stress response. Modern healthcare is increasingly recognizing that many illnesses are caused by stress, or worsened by stress. In fact, in every chiropractic office, many patients will show the ravages of chronic stress. While chiropractic can treat the effects of stress on the body, such as headaches, it can also help the body manage and process stress in a healthy way.

The different factors that create stress:

Physical Stress

A whiplash injury from a c
ar accident is an obvious source of physical stress. As is repetitive motions, a slip and fall, lack of sleep or overdoing it in the garden. Early on, learning to walk, ride a bike and the birth process itself are sources of physical stress.

It’s not the stressphysical stress—it’s your reaction to it that matters!

Accumulated stress exhausts our reserves. Then, something as simple as mowing the lawn can put us over the edge. Chiropractic care helps restore your adaptive capacity.

 

Emotional Stress

Fear, grief, anger and other emotions affect our entire body. Notice the posture of someone who isemotional stress sad or depressed. Frustration, or a sense of powerlessness at work, is a common form of emotional stress.

Clearly, it’s not the stress, but our response to it that is critical. Chiropractic care, because its focus is to reduce tension to your nervous system, can help you respond more resourcefully.

 

Chemical Stress

Common sources of chemical stress include poor nutrition, sugar, refined carbohydrates and unhealthy fats. Drugs, preservatives, tobacco, alcohol, vaccinations, pollen and a host of other substances also affect our nervous systems, muscle tone and our spine.

The problem isn’t the pollen or chemical stresschemical. Because not everyone reacts. Symptoms can appear when you lose your ability to adapt. Chiropractic care has helped millions reduce or eliminate reactions to many types of chemical stress

If you lack the reserves to adapt to stress in a healthy way, it takes a toll. If your body reacts by “tripping a circuit breaker,” causing vertebral subluxation, chiropractic care is likely to help.

Martini caption: Clearly, chemical stress can affect our muscle tone, coordination and the way our nervous system works.

 

How can stress affect my spine?

Think of your spinal cord as a guitar string. The greater the tension, the higher the note. Your nervous system has “tone” as well. With each stressor, your body tightens up, like bracing yourself for a tight curve on a roller coaster. The weakest joints of your spine are forced out of their normal position. Like the shrill notes from an over-tightened string, your body loses its capacity to respond to the full range of human experience. And ill health can result.

Effects of Stress on Health

Stress, whether physical or perceived, triggers a fight or flight response. This is a systemic physical reaction, affecting almost every part of the body. The hypothalamus, a part of the brain, stimulates the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). The heart rate increases, blood volume and blood pressure increase, blood is directed away from digestion and the extremities. Vision becomes more focused, hearing more acute. In response to the messages from the SNS, the adrenal glands secrete corticoids, including adrenaline, epinephrine and norepinephrine. All of this is very useful if we’re running from a prehistoric raptor, or confronting a more modern threat to physical safety. When prolonged, however, the long-term effects of this state can be disastrous to good health.

Many studies of people who have been subjected to chronic stress have found evidence of the negative health effects of stress. These effects include high blood pressure, damage to muscle tissue, diabetes, infertility, damage to the immune response, and slowed healing from disease and injury. Stress reactions are also at the root of disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder, and stress has been linked in human and animal research with cardiovascular disease.

Chiropractic Treatment and Stress

Chiropractors work primarily with the spine, the root of the nervous system through which nerve impulses travel from the brain to the rest of the body. One effect of chronic stress is prolonged muscle tension and contraction. This muscle tension creates uneven pressures on the bony structures of the body, often leading the misalignment of the spinal column, known as subluxations in the Palmer tradition of chiropractic.

Chronic stress also leads to nerve irritation. The adjustments of a chiropractor release muscle tension, and that helps the body return to a more balanced, relaxed state. Adjustments also reduce spinal nerve irritation, and improve blood circulation. These changes may be enough, in many cases, to convince the brain to turn off the fight or flight response, beginning the process of healing. A healthy and balanced spine is one key to effectively managing stress.

Dr Sandhu has been studying nutrition and other therapies for stress. Several nutritional supplements, including B vitamins, help the body cope with stress. As can relaxation techniques, coupled with posture and environmental changes to help recovery from chronic stress.

Unfortunately we cannot make a job less stressful, or create a quieter, calmer world. What chiropractic treatment can do is help you develop healthy responses to stress, reducing potential physical damage.

Chiropractic is based on the concept that given the opportunity, the mind and body can heal itself. In relieving some of the effects of chronic stress, chiropractic care provides just such an opportunity. So why not get yourself booked in for an initial consultation for only 10 and let’s see what we can do.

Natural Remedies For Slim Thighs And Hips

1. Water:

We’ve been told repeatedly about how water is great for the body, skin and more. It can help flush out toxins, helps you stay at your optimum levels and even clears out your acne! You must drink about 8 to 10 glasses of water a day, and ensure you begin your day with a glass of water and end it with one. Consume fruits and vegetables with high water content as the liver requires water to convert fat into energy and also to boost your metabolism. According to research, water increases metabolic rate and accelerates weight loss when consumed with a low calorie diet.

2. Yoga:

Yoga is the best form of exercise, to lose weight, burn fat and stay healthy. However, regular practice is required to perfect the asanas. Yoga also tones the muscles and keeps
the skin firm. Practice the Cobbler’s pose and the bridge pose, which target the hips and thighs.

3. Cardio and strength training:

We all know it, but still fail to follow this. A disciplined exercise regime can give you a sculpted body. For cardio, you can get on the treadmill or the stationary bike. For strength
training, include squats and curls to target the hips and thighs.

4. Coconut oil massage:

The nutrients in coconut oil strengthen the skin tissue and also help you lose extra fat from the body. Coconut oil also increases your metabolism, and lowers cholesterol levels. Massage the hips and thighs with coconut oil for about 10 minutes daily. The fatty acids in coconut oil get absorbed in the body and get converted into energy.

5. Apple cider vinegar:

ACV helps flush out the toxins from the body, assists in the breakdown of fat and also controls the amount of glucose released in your body after you eat.  So, mix 3 parts of raw apple cider vinegar with 1 part of olive or coconut oil. Massage and leave for 30 minutes.
Do this twice a day.