Bella’s Wish

Bellas Wish

Bedfordshire Chiropractic Clinic is having a Wellbeing Evening on September 22nd at 6pm
to raise money for Bella’s Wish.

Treatments include Chiropractic Scans, mini massage & henna body art.

Just £5 a ticket including one free treatment

Order tickets or to pre-book a treatment time Please contact Bedford Chiropractic Clinic on 01234 353937

This is to help raise funds for 6 year old, Bella, to have Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy treatment at Great Ormond Street Hospital, currently this is not available on the NHS.

Bella was born with Spastic Diplegia Cerebral Palsy – caused by a brain injury, this affects the control of leg movement and co-ordination. Bella uses a wheelchair but can use a walking frame for very short distances when fully supervised.

Bella is the sweetest, kindest, funniest little girl, she is brave and strong – but she wants to walk, she smiles through evry hospital appointment, physio session, injection and serial casting because she believes it will worth it in the end.

SDR is a neurological procedure that reduced the stiff muscles – it’s not a cure for Cerebral Palsy and we cannot predict the outcome but leg movement, control, range and speed will all improve after the operation. The effects of the operation are permanent – and the usual decline of movement which is seen in adolescence is non-existent in those who have had the procedure.

Although the improvements will be instant, it could take 2 years for the outcome to be clear.
https://crowdfunding.justgiving.com/BellasWish

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Chiropractic for Olympic Champions!

William Moreau, DC, serves as chief medical officer for Team USA at Rio 2016 Olympic Games

July 18, 2016—The Foundation for Chiropractic Progress (F4CP), the voice of the chiropractic profession, highlights the role of doctors of chiropractic (DCs) in the care of amateur and professional athletes, citing the continued leadership of William Moreau, DC, DACBSP as managing director of sports medicine for the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) and chief medical officer for Team USA at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

With chiropractic care now established as a key component of the health services available to Olympic and Paralympic athletes, experts at the F4CP note that the care provided by a DC helps to maximize overall health and maintain peak performance among athletes.

“Olympic and Paralympic athletes access care from a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals, including DCs who hold additional ACBSP certifications in sports chiropractic (an active Diplomate American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians (DACBSP) or Certified Chiropractic Sports Physician certification is necessary), as well as advanced techniques in soft tissue cares, joint mobility, active care and others,” said Moreau. “Chiropractic plays an important role in preventive, maintenance or injury specific care, and contributes to enhanced clinical outcomes and high patient satisfaction levels among all athletes.”

Doctors of chiropractic – who receive a minimum of seven years of higher level education – are primary care professionals for spinal health and well-being, and are qualified to diagnose, treat and manage a broad spectrum of health conditions.

For athletes, chiropractic care can help to reduce the risk of injuries, accelerate recovery time and improve health and performance through enhancements in range of motion, flexibility, balance, muscle strength and other key factors.

 

(Usain Bolt receiving Chiropractic Care before his race) 

Sherry McAllister, DC, executive vice president, F4CP, states, “It is gratifying to witness the demand for and growing utilization of chiropractic care among professional athletes. The evidence-based, hands-on chiropractic approach utilizes a variety of techniques, including spinal manipulation, to help restore functionality of the spine and nervous system to ensure optimal well-being, and inevitably fuel competitive athletic performance.”

Are Toxins in Potatoes Possibly Harming your Body?

Are Toxins in Potatoes Possibly Harming your Body?

What you need to know about natural toxins found in potatoes and potato skins and the effects on your body

Guest Article by Nate Miyaki – Nutritionist, Author of Feast Your Fat Away
Try to eat a bird in the wild, and it will try to peck off your hand.

Try to reel in a Marlin without being prepared for battle, and it will take you for a swim and then stab you in the heart.

The point is that all animals have defense mechanisms against potential predators.

Guess what?  So do plants, but they are just not as obvious as claws or teeth.  They have more innovative ways of trying to NOT get eaten.

Most plants produce some sort of toxic compounds that they use to ward off insects and animals.  Who cares right?  Well, those same compounds can be problematic for both human digestion and overall health.

Now don’t panic… eating that salad is not going kill you.

As you know, it’s the dose that makes the poison with any natural toxin.  Small exposure to a toxin – such as the alcohol in a glass of red wine or a dark beer – has an antioxidant effect and can actually improve your health.  But large and frequent exposure – like a daily Jack Daniels Attack – can cause alcohol poisoning and liver disease.

Today I want to talk to you about the toxic compounds in a food that’s near and dear to my heart – POTATOES, aka – taters.

TATERS AND TOXINS

First, lets establish I believe in a relatively moderate carbohydrate approach for those who perform anaerobic training on a regular basis… Not too low, not too high, and eaten at the right times of day.

While sedentary populations generally do better with a lower carbohydrate approach, some controlled and well-timed carbs can help an athlete properly fuel and recover from intense strength or cross-training sessions.

Yet we know the many problems associated with concentrated sources of refined sugar, gluten, cereal grains, and other foods in a typical Y2K diet.  That’s the value of a Paleolithic approach to nutrition – eliminate the crap without the complexity.

So where can we turn to for anaerobic carb fuel?  Many Paleo proponents who exercise intensely regularly recommend potatoes and/or sweet potatoes as their primary carb source.

I agree, with a subtle caveat — the preparation of those potatoes matter, especially if you’re eating them on a near daily basis.

Remember, the frequency of exposure to a toxin, and the dose, makes the difference.

I’ve worked with athletes that tried regular potatoes as their primary starch fuel and complained of side effects such as inflammation and joint pain.

Others have tried sweet potatoes and complained of bloating and other gastrointestinal distress.

In both cases, the fact that they were eating “carbs” in general was blamed.  But the reality was it wasn’t the glucose/starch that was the problem.  It was the natural toxic compounds coming along with, and protecting that starch… the plant’s natural defense system.

PEEL TO FEEL BETTER

Lets start with the bad news first.  In addition to starch, potatoes contain toxic compounds called glycoalkaloids.  This is their own little toxic compound they use to ward off predators (like us humans) from eating the potato and thereby killing it.

The good news?  The majority of these glycoalkaloids are located in the skins of potatoes.

Thus, if you eat potatoes on a regular basis, I suggest you peel, boil, and eat them without the skins.  Why? You end up with good starch that you can use as anaerobic fuel (if you workout intensely), along with a decent variety of vitamins and minerals that are found in potatoes, but WITHOUT the potential drawbacks of overexposure to the toxic compounds found mostly in the skins.

Sure, that means you’re throwing away a little bit of the fiber of the potato, but I think you’ll agree it’s best to pass on a couple grams of fiber if it means you eliminate most of the TOXINS too!

What about sweet potatoes?

Now, the science is not so clear when it comes to sweet potatoes, as they are a completely different classification of plant from regular potatoes, and don’t contain these particular toxins we’ve identified in potatoes.  But my personal anecdotal evidence as an athlete and coach is clear.

I’ve worked with many strength trainers that complained of GI distress when emphasizing sweet potatoes as their primary carbohydrate source.  I experienced this personally.  My suspicion was that some compound located in the skins caused it.

It makes sense logically right?  The skin is that outer layer that wards off predators, especially those that don’t walk around with a handy-dandy peeler.   So we tested this theory…

And sure enough, when the same peeling method was applied, removing the skins of sweet pototoes, the GI distress went away for the majority of my clients.  The consistency was too much to just be coincidence.

RICE CAN ALSO BE NICE

I look at the skins of potatoes and sweet potatoes much in the same way I look at the bran of rice.

If you are a Paleo geek, you already know the problem with most cereal grains – “anti-nutrients” such as phytic acid can inhibit mineral absorption and cause GI distress.  Brown rice is no different.

Yet in more informed Paleo circles, especially those that include regular intense exercisers, white rice is often included as what is referred to as a “safe starch” option.  I agree 100%.

The “anti-nutrient” or phytic acid that is problematic for digestion and nutrient absorption is located in the bran of the grain. This is removed in the milling process that essentially changes brown rice to white rice.

That’s why cultures that eat a lot of rice generally eat white rice.  It’s probably due more to natural intuition than scientific method.

CAVEMAN AND CULTURAL CONCLUSIONS

I believe evolutionary history teaches us valuable lessons about optimum nutrition for health, without information overload, or waiting for science to “catch” up to what nature has been trying to teach us for centuries.

I also believe some cultural approaches to nutrition can do the same for merging health with modern performance and physique goals.

As I wrap this thing up, I’m looking down at my Japanese-style dinner. The side of rice is white, and the sweet potato next to it is peeled, boiled, and mashed.  In a cultural diet that includes these foods on a regular basis, that’s for a reason!

-Nate


Hey, it’s Mike here… Thanks Nate for a great article!  I recently met Nate and have found him to be one of the most knowledgeable guys I’ve talked to about nutrition in a long time.

4 YOGA POSES TO MASTER THIS SUMMER

During the summer, it feels like plans are never ending and a new invite pops up on your calendar every day! Although we usually think of summer as a season of relaxation, these months can get pretty busy – sometimes to the point where you actually have to set aside time for yourself. We love a good Netflix binge as much as the next person, but we’ve also discovered that there are more productive options if you need to de-stress… and, surprise!, you won’t end up feeling like a couch potato after. One of our favorite ways to unwind is by getting active, whether that means taking a walk outside, lifting weights in the gym or hitting the mat for some yoga. Active movement helps to clear your mind and strengthen your body. Plus, it’s a great way to show off your athleisure #AEOSTYLE! Today, we’re grabbing our yoga mats and breaking down four yoga poses to master this summer.

CRESCENT LUNGE (Anjaneyasana):
Alignment Tips: Make sure you’re on the ball of your back foot and that your hips are square. Sometimes it helps to put your hands on your hips and psychically align them so that they’re facing the front wall. Keep your back heel firm on the floor and the back leg strong as if you were trying to touch the back of your knee to the ceiling. To your own degree, bend your front knee as close to 90 degrees as possible. Reach your arms overheard and breath deep.

Benefits: Stretches hip flexors & legs; strengthens thighs and glutes; opens chest; improves balance

Master these 4 yoga poses by the end of summer!

DANCER (Natarajasana):
Alignment Tips: Keep a slight bend in your standing leg & shift weight on to this leg. Bend your back leg up to your degree slowly, simultaneously catching your foot or ankle with one or both hands if possible. You can reach one arm in front to help your balance. Keep your neck long and head high.

Benefits: Improves balance; strengthens legs and core; stretches shoulders and chest

Master these 4 yoga poses by the end of summer!

ONE LEGGED KING PIGEON (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana):
Alignment Tips: Keep your shin on the ground parallel to your mat to protect the knee. Slightly angle your back hip and from a straight leg, bend the back leg up. Catch the ankle or foot with one or both hands, or rest it in your arm as seen below. If you cannot reach back or bend the leg up, that’s fine! support yourself upright using both arms in front.

Benefits: Stretches thighs, chest and shoulders; stimulates abdomen & internal organs

Master these 4 yoga poses by the end of summer!

ONE LEGGED KING PIGEON II (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana II):
Alignment Tips: Start with shins on the floor and core reaching high. Slowly backbend to your degree and catch one leg within your arm as your raise it. Reach the other arm toward the ceiling and breathe. If you need back support, bring your lower hand to your lower back and breathe.

Benefits: Stretches torso and deep hip flexors; improves posture; strengthens back; stimulates abdominal organs

Master these 4 yoga poses by the end of summer!

Heel Pain – Plantar Fasciitis

footpainPlantar fasciitis causes pain in the bottom of the heel. The plantar fascia is a thin, ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot.
It supports the arch of your foot and helps you walk.

Signs & Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis:

  • Pain and stiffness in the bottom of the heel 
  • It can affect one foot or both feet.
  • It can be a dull pain, sharp pain, some feel a burning or ache on the bottom of the foot extending outward from the heel.
  • The pain is usually worse in the morning when you take your first steps out of bed, or if you’ve been sitting or lying down for a while.
  • Climbing stairs can be very difficult due to heel stiffness.
  • After prolonged activity, the pain can flare up due to increased inflammation. Pain isn’t usually felt during the activity but rather just after stopping.

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common orthopedic complaints. Your plantar fascia ligaments experience a lot of wear and tear in your daily life. Normally, these ligaments support the arch of the foot. Too much pressure on your feet can damage or tear the ligaments. The plantar fascia becomes inflamed and the inflammation causes heel pain and stiffness.

Treatment Options for Plantar Faciitis:

At Bedford Chiropractic clinic, Our expert Dr Sandu will evaluate the strength of your muscles and the health of your nerves by checking your:

  • reflexes
  • muscle tone
  • sense of touch and sight
  • coordination
  • balance

Using the latest technology our Laser Foot Scanner will show the areas on on the foot which are experiencing the greatest pressure, helping Dr Sandu to adapt your treatment to get the best from your body, to aid your recovery and Special orthotics, or arch supports, for your shoes may help alleviate some of the pain by distributing pressure, and they can prevent further damage to the plantar fascia.

10 Simple Exercises to Restore Balance and Eliminate Neck and Back Pain

You do your best to get results from your workouts… you eat well, you train hard and yet you still feel like you’re falling short of hitting your peak.

Low energy, grogginess, shortage of breath and neck and back pain are just some of the problems you may be suffering from. But why? How does a perfectly healthy, athletic individual who eats well and trains hard STILL suffer?

Let me explain… there’s a problem which no less than 90% of the US population suffers from.

It’s a problem that nobody is tackling, that doctors are failing to diagnose and which poses just as many health risks as obesity…

… and you’re probably suffering from it, too.

It affects nearly everyone, no matter what your age or level of fitness. It’s a problem that originates in just one area of your body but affects your overall health, including your mental as well as your physical state.

And the craziest thing is, you probably see
this problem EVERY SINGLE DAY.

It’s forward head posture… also known as texting neck.

You’ve probably seen it yourself, in those guys and girls who are physically active but walk around with a chicken head or giraffe neck.

Instead of a powerful, strong chest, their shoulders are hunched forward, their head droops down and their curved back almost gives them a hump.

It looks weak, unhealthy and unsightly. And it undoes all their hard work.

Your neck is designed to remain vertical, supporting the weight of your skull in a perfect line from the top of your head straight down through your body to your feet.

When you look at yourself in the mirror from the side, your ear, your shoulder and your hips should all be in a straight line down to the floor. If it is unaligned and your ear is in front of your shoulders, it’s a sure sign of forward head posture.

You see, the average head weighs 10-12lbs. When your head sits perfectly upon your neck and shoulders, the body naturally adapts to holding this weight.

But if your head is constantly pulled forward, the weight of your head pulls on your neck and puts pressure on your spine.

When your head is pulled forward the additional pressure on your neck, shoulders and back rises dramatically causing serious tissue damage. In fact, every inch your head is thrust forward from its natural position adds another 10 lbs of stress on the neck, shoulders, back and spine.

It’s why you may have developed that ugly ‘hump’ below your neck; to combat the stress of holding your head up, the body’s reaction has been to build-up bone and fat tissue to compensate and protect the spine at the C7 vertebrae.

Forward head posture doesn’t just leave you looking awkward… No matter how hard you train or how well you eat, unless you start fixing your head posture right now, it may not be possible to reverse the damage already done.

Before I explain why your posture could be killing you, let me introduce myself.

Coach Mike WesterdalMy name is Mike Westerdal and I’m a national best-selling fitness author, sports nutrition specialist, personal trainer, Iron Man magazine contributor and founder of the internet’s longest-standing strength site, CriticalBench.com

Shortly, I’ll explain to you how it’s possible to fix your forward head posture using just 10 really simple movements that instantly improve your posture and increase your strength, energy and vitality.

But first, let me show you the many ways forward head posture is damaging your health and holding you back.

Although few realize they have a posture problem, fewer still realize how many problems are caused by Forward Head Posture.

The most obvious concern is the physical appearance….

YOUR POOR HEAD POSTURE IS MAKING YOU LOOK 10 LBS HEAVIER AND 2 INCHES SHORTER THAN YOU ACTUALLY ARE

As the main connector between your upper torso and skull, the neck has the crucial task of cradling the body’s computer — the brain.

When I personally discovered that I suffered from Forward Head Posture, I was shocked at the impact it had on my health. The number of symptoms I could directly trace back to poor posture was just as shocking.

Not only does Forward Head Posture give your back that ugly hunch and crouched-over look… it also causes much deeper, serious problems including:

  • Constant fatigue and lack of energy
  • Pain in your neck, shoulders or upper, lower and middle back
  • Permanent damage to your joints, muscles, ligaments, blood vessels & nerves
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Poor sleep or insomnia
  • Arthritis
  • Impaired athletic performance
  • Loss of height by 2 inches
  • Looking 10 lbs fatter than you actually are
  • Affects your hormonal health
  • Noisy mouth breathing, snoring & sleep apnea
  • Early degeneration of your spine
  • Pinched and trapped nerves
  • Decreased range of motion
  • Lack of confidence
  • Blood Flow to the Brain
  • Asthma
  • Decreased lung capacity by up to 30%
  • Harmful affects to vision and hearing
  • Jaw pain and sinus issues
  • Dizziness, vertigo and balance issues
  • Burdens your digestive system

If you’ve suffered any of these without realizing the root problem was Forward Head Posture, you’re not alone.

Forward Head Posture or FHP affects nearly everybody, yet hardly anyone understands the serious long-term physical and mental damage it can cause.

And it’s the most important muscle in your neck that dictates just how strong and healthy our posture and well-being is.

Tennis and Chiropractic

To become as good a tennis player as Andy Murray take many years of dedicated practice and with years and years of practice increases the risk of accumulated injuries.

With Wimbledon comes an upsurge of interest in tennis,we offer some invaluable advice on staying injury free this tennis season.

For two weeks at the end of June, a certain ‘fever’ tends to sweep the country, this being ‘tennis fever’. Tennis is the second most played racket sport in the UK, close to overtaking badminton in popularity, with an estimated 860,000 people playing.

Bedford Chiropractic Clinic will  see an increase in tennis related injuries. Just the same thing happens every year  in the tennis season but with Andy Murray winning even more people will try tennis for the first time.

Playing tennis is a great way to stay physically fit but it requires a variety of physical attributes, including power, endurance, speed, strength, balance, and of course specific playing skills. Compared to other sports, the risk of injury from playing tennis is relatively low, but there are certain factors that increase the risk of an injury that apply to both competitive and social players:

  • Incorrect technique – poor serve and swing technique will increase the chance of injury, particularly to the elbow and wrist. Relying on only the arm to hit the ball, as opposed to the body’s full strength, leads to an incorrect swinging action. A healthy spine able to flex and absorb these heavy twisting loads the discs in the spine can suffer serious injury that can impact everyday life not just sporting ability.
  • Failure to warm up and cool down – warming up / cooling down reduces the risk of muscle and joint injuries, and improves performance.
  • Time spent playing – overexertion is one of the most common causes of injury, and with insufficient rest and recovery time for the body, overuse injuries are more likely to occur.
  • Previous injury – previous injury can lead to similar injuries in the future, especially if you hadn’t taken enough time to fully recover.

When it comes to tennis injuries, they fall into one of two categories; two-thirds of tennis injuries are due to overuse, and the other one-third due to trauma or an acute event such as sudden force or impact. Cumulative, or overuse, injuries most often affect the shoulders, elbows and wrists, with acute injuries affecting the low back, knee or ankle.

Tennis Elbow – the most well-known of all tennis injuries, it is estimated that over 50% of players will suffer with it at some point in their career. It is an overuse injury of the muscles that bend the wrist backwards, from repeated contraction, and can also be caused by improper technique, such as using too much wrist and not enough arm when you hit a backhand shot (faulty backhand follow-through).

Tennis Shoulder – shoulder overuse injuries are usually a result of poor conditioning and strength of the rotatory cuff muscles, a group of muscles at the back of the shoulder. These muscles help to position the shoulder correctly in the socket, and a weakness can cause an increase in ‘play’ of the ball in the socket, irritating the tissues. Tennis shoulder injuries often appear after over-loading the rotator cuff when the muscles are contracting, and are usually caused during the follow-through phase of the serve. These injuries cause pain when the ball makes contact with the racquet during the serve, and cause a decrease in serve velocity.

Tennis Ankle – these injuries fall into the traumatic/acute bracket and are caused by a sudden sideways movement, such as pivoting while making a subtle but rapid change in direction, resulting in twisting or turning the ankle inwards. Playing on a slippery wet surface increases the risk of these types of injuries, as does continuing to play, even when fatigue is overwhelming you.

Low back pain – many tennis players will suffer with low back pain at one time or another. It can be caused by the twisting/rotating movement when trying to hit the ball, the sudden deceleration and changes in direction during a game, or over-extending the back during the serve; this repetitive action places considerable stress on the muscles, tendons and ligaments around the spine, and on the spinal joints themselves. Any accumulation of injury to the discs must be avoided at all times as the discs do not have a blood supply and cannot heal very well. All too often this fact is ignored and the damage accumulated becomes too extensive and permanent disability is the result. Just taking painkillers and waiting for such injuries to heal is a recipe for disaster.

What is a Stress Fracture of the Back?

A stress fracture of the back, or lumbar spine, is one of the more common bone injuries in young tennis players. Lower back stress fractures are usually characterized by an ache in the lower back which is exacerbated by sporting activities and eased by rest, although a small percentage of people with a stress fracture can be pain free. Typically it is sore when the patient bends backwards, particularly if standing on one leg. If a lower back stress fracture is suspected, a chiropractor may decide to refer the patient for a MRI scan to confirm the diagnosis.

What can you do to prevent a Stress Fracture?

Serving in tennis requires a combination of spinal hyper extension (bending back) together with rotation and side bending of the trunk. This puts a lot of stress on an area of the vertebra called the Pars Interarticularis and this is where stress fracture develops.

Practicing the service should be carefully monitored by the coach to ensure the lower back is not being overloaded. This is particulary important in adolescent players who have just experienced a growth spurt as they are known to be more at risk from this injury.

core stability exercises can help prevent back problems in tennis players.

What should you do if you suffer a Stress Fracture of the Back?

In most cases, complete rest from tennis is the treatment of choice. This would usually be for a period of 6 weeks to allow the bone to heal. In the early stages, a soothing ice pack can reduce back pain and alleviate back pain. During this period, a progressive exercise programme may commence, under the supervision of a qualified chiropractor. This usually starts with exercises to increase the muscular stability in the lower back.

Research has shown that a lack of muscular stability in the lumbar and pelvic regions can lead to low back pain and stress fractures. The principle behind this is that if certain specific muscles can be recruited or contracted, the spine will have much better support. This prevents postural faults which can predispose a person to back pain.

Spine injuries common in young tennis players

Elite tennis players in their teens appear to have a very high rate of lower spine injury, a 2007  study suggests. Although the subjects in this study did not have symptoms, the researchers point out that these injuries will probably progress to more serious conditions if training techniques are not modified. As with common back problems because it doesn’t hurt doesn’t mean that a problem doesn’t exit.

The British researchers found that of 33 elite-level tennis players they examined, 85 percent had some sort of abnormality in the lower spine. Damage to the joints at the back of the spine, stress fractures and herniated discs were among the problems seen on MRI scans.

Tennis players’ careers depend largely on how well they perform at the junior level, the study authors note in their report, published online by the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

This means that during their growth spurt years, young athletes are going through frequent and intense training that can raise their risk of injury.

Tennis involves constant spinal movements — like quick twists and backward arching — that can account for the injuries seen in this study, according to the authors, led by Dr. David Connell of the Royal National Orthopedic Hospital.

The findings are based on 18 male and 15 female athletes training at a UK national tennis center. None complained of any back pain, but using MRI scans, Connell’s team found that only five players had normal exam results.

The most common abnormality was facet joint arthropathy, damage to joints at the back of the spine that are involved in backward arching. A full 70 percent of the players showed this problem; in contrast, studies of middle-aged adults in the general population have found that 8 percent to 21 percent of symptom-free people have facet joint arthropathy, demonstrating that spinal wear and tear is not painful until we then overload already weakened joints.

In addition, the researchers found, more than one quarter of the players had sustained stress fractures in bone structures at the back of the spine, while nearly 40 percent had herniated spinal discs.

It’s important to spot such abnormalities, they conclude, so that training can be modified to prevent the problem from worsening.

SOURCE: British Journal of Sports Medicine, July 19, 2007 online.

When looking at ways to help avoid tennis injuries, we can split it into 5 key areas:

Environment:

  • avoid playing on hard surface courts with no ‘give’, such as cement, asphalt or synthetic courts.
  • inspect the court for holes/cracks that may trip you up.
  • ensure the court is well lit if playing at night.
  • avoid playing in extreme weather conditions.
  • never play on a wet court.
  • clean off leaves, debris, loose balls etc. from the court.

Dress:

  • wear shoes specifically designed for tennis that support the heel and prevent ankle rolling, choose tennis shoes with skid-resistant soles and high arch supports.
  • consider wearing heel inserts or specially padded tennis socks to absorb the shock when playing on hard services to protect the lower back.

Equipment:

  • see a professional to select a racquet that is the appropriate size and weight, and one that suits your skill level; too light or heavy will increase the risk of shoulder/elbow injuries.
  • a flexible racquet with a larger head is gentler on the arm as the flexion absorbs some of the shock, spreading it over a longer period; this helps to prevent a tennis elbow injury.
  • low string tension is better on the arm as it increases the dwell time of the ball on the strings.
  • thinner strings are more elastic and have better shock-absorbing capacities, making them better for the arm.
  • a grip that is too small or large will increase the risk of an elbow injury as the player has to grip the racquet too tightly to prevent it from twisting.
  • never play with wet tennis balls, especially if you have had a previous shoulder/arm injury.
  • avoid old or low-pressure balls; aim to replace them as soon as they start to lose their bounce.

Preparation:

  • working on stretching and toning your arm muscles off the court will guard against injury; swimming is a good way to achieve this.
  • warm up gently, increase your heart rate with a slow jog or jumping jacks.
  • slowly stretch muscles to improve joint range of motion, and promote elasticity in the ligaments and tendons; hold stretches for 30 seconds.
  • start slowly, hitting a few balls to your opponent; serve several times until the shoulder feels looser.
  • be sure to cool down with stretches after playing to prevent stiff and sore muscles and joints.

Technique:

  • take lessons from a qualified coach to develop skills and technique.
  • when serving/hitting overhead, avoid over-arching the lower back; bend your knees and raise your heels instead, so the upper body weight is evenly balanced.
  • avoid landing on the ball of the foot as this can lead to an Achilles’ tendon injury.
  • hitting the ball in front of the body makes it easier to fully use the shoulder and trunk.
  • forearm muscles are better able to handle the shock if the wrist is held straight when the ball impacts the racquet.
  • use the forearm for control, and the shoulder/trunk for strength.
  • use the other arm for balance with one-handed backhand.
  • in the event of a previous injury or weakness to the elbow, try a two-handed backhand. If you sustain an injury on the tennis court, the best plan of action is to stop playing and seek the appropriate advice and treatment.
  • Chiropractors, whilst best known for treating spinal injuries, are also trained in treating all of the other joints of the body, including the shoulder, elbow and wrist. If you get gripped with tennis fever, and even with following these hints and tips, you still sustain an injury of your muscles, bones or joints, chiropractic may have the answer.

Our New Activator 5!

Hi! Dr Sandhu here, hope you have all recovered from the excitement from last night, what an incredible display of the power of our weather. I must say I’m really excited as I have just received my brand new Activator 5! Another example of our continual drive to give the best chiropractic adjust possible to our patients!

The Activator Method is one of the most widely-researched chiropractic techniques and the only instrument adjusting technique with clinical trials to support its efficacy. Activator Methods has published hundreds of clinical and scientific peer-reviewed papers, worked with major academic research institutions, and received grants from recognized entities like the National Institutes of Health.

Activator 5

  • Utilizes a force wave that allows deeper penetration of the force without discomfort to the patient.
  • Recognized for superior control of speed, force, and direction of thrust.
  • Perfect for use on the more tender areas of the body, due to the light, pre-load spring.
  • Ideal for treating Cervicals, TMJ, Children, Geriatrics, and small body frames utilizing the #1 setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out our website http://www.thebedfordchiropractor.co.uk

 

EnergyDOTS

  1. PHI TECHNOLOGY

Each DOT is programmed with a powerful resonant energy signature which retunes energy interference.

  1. ENERGY INTERFERENCE EXPLAINED

EMF’S (electro-magnetic frequencies) from mobile phones, laptops, computers, gaming equipment, WIFI etc. all emit low level radiation. Some people find the constant level of EMF’S challenging and have what is termed ‘electro-stress’. Symptoms of electro-stress include headaches, tiredness, insomnia, inability to concentrate, unexplained pins and needles and in extreme cases depression and anxiety. Scientific enjoy technology which is here to stay. Energy DOTs allow you to live with and enjoy technology more safely.

  1. ENERGYDOTS EXPLAINED

There are a choice of four EnergyDOTs that can be used on their own or in a combination, depending on your lifestyle. EnergyDOTs are small round magnets that store ‘energy information’. Information storage devices are not a new concept; video/tape cassettes and bank cards are all storage devices. On a bank card the magnetic stripe stores numeric information about your bank account. EnergyDOTs however are programmed with a particular energy signature using a proprietary system know as Phi technology. This signature or resonance returns man-made electro-magnetic frequencies to a natural resonance.

  1. HOW DO ENERGYDOTS WORK

The energy signature retunes man made EMF’s to a natural harmonic state. This process is known as entrainment. The DOT acts as a turning fork on EMD’s in its immediate environment.

  1. ENTRAINMENT EXPLAINED

Entrainment is a basic principal of physics. It is explained as ‘ the synchronisation of the tow or more rhythmic cycles’; vibrations from one source lock into another. Energy works in co-operation rather than opposition so the most natural consent vibration will predominate. Examples of entrainment can be found biologically (women living in the same environment will menstruate at the same time), mechanically (pendulums from clocks will swing in time) and emotionally (walk into a room where there is happiness and raised mood and your mood will be lifted). EnergyDOTs entrain discordant energy fields.

  1. ENERGYDOTS – WHY SO POWERFUL?

EnergyDOTs are activated by proprietary Phi technology. Their activation is similar to any other homeopathic remedy, where an energy signature is stored in a solid substance. The principal of Phi is used when programming. Phi is the perfect proportion 1-1.618. This perfect proportion is found in the proportion of the human body, our DNA, the growth pattern of flowers, the pattern of sunflower seeds and the pattern of the galaxies. Phi is the Golden Ratio and it creates beauty.

  1. TYPES OF ENERGYDOTS

There are four energyDOTs in the range;

SMARTDOT– The smartDOT is the core of the phi energyDOT range. It is programmed to harmonise or retune electromagnetic radiation from the wireless electronic equipment you use regularly, such as mobile phones, cordless (DECT) phones, laptops, computers, baby monitors and WIFI routers. each sell in our body acts like an antenna, an extremely sensitive receiver and transmitter of electromagnetic radiation; the body will thus ‘pick up’ and react to any such filed to which it is exposed the effects vary but the fact in the overall our bodies have not harmonise up to one metre so, for example, a desktop computer with separate monitor and hard drive would only require one smartDOT on either piece of equipment.

BioDOT– The natural, coherent frequencies used in the programming of the bioDOT harmonise or return your energy filed. They remind your energy field of its optimal state, making it more coherent and resilient. It is like recharging your battery, restoring and rebalancing your energy. In today’s high tech world a vibration energy supplement designed to support your energy system is key to a healthy lifestyle. BIODOT products include the bioBAND, bioTAG, bioCLIP and enclosed pendant. It will effectively harmonise up to one metre so, for example, it would still be effective if placed on a bed side table during night.

AquaDOT– The aquaDOT is designed to refresh the natural energetic structure of water, removing imprinting from EMFs and other sources. This gives your body the best chance to renew itself on a cellular level.

 

SpaceDOT– Used to harmonise distributive energies and uplift the energy in your home or work space; earth energise such as a geopathic disturbance, emotional residues from previous occupants, architectural and historic elements. The space dot will harmonise and environment up to a radius of 5 metres.

  1. RESEARCH

Our research has been done using double blind placebo effect – concurrent validity. We also have many years of anecdotal evidence.                                                                                                                     

  1. Medical Thermal Imaging– subjects use a mobile phone. Thermal imaging demonstrates how a mobile phone heats up the tissues of the brain. Using a smartDOT (formerly electroDOT) reduces the heating effect. This is shown by the colours in the MTI pictures.
  2. Microscopy – live red blood cells sown. Before espouser to a mobile phone the cells have lost their negative charge and are clumping together. The subject at this point is feeling electro-stress symptoms. A further one hour using the mobile phone with a smartDOT (formerly electroDOT) and the microscopy shows that the blood cells have returned to their original state.
  3. Chick Pea research – This was done ‘in house’. Two mobile phones used, one with and one without a smartDOT on (formerly electroDOT) chick peas are placed next to each of the phones. the chick peas next to the mobile phone with the smartDOT (formerly electroDOT) on have a healthier root growth than the chick peas next to the mobile phone without the smartDOT (formally electroDOT) on have a healthier root growth than the chick peas next to the mobile phone without the smartDot (formerly electroDOT) on.
  4. GDV imaging (Gas Discharge visualisation) – subject found that after two days of using the SmartDOT (formerly electroDOT) on the mobile phone, overall energy leaks and distorted have reduced and the energy field appears to be much more symmetrical.                              
  5. PIP (Polycentrism Interference Photography) – A bioDOT is used and photography shows in real time the positive effects on the energy field of the subject.

 

 

4 Key Beginner Yoga Poses For Men

If you’re a guy, it’s easy to find yoga intimidating. This feeling is understandable. As a gender, there’s a cultural push to make us work out hard, compete, and do sports that tighten us up instead of loosen us up.

 

Sometimes, we’re intimidated because of neglect. In this little article, I’m going to make your entrance into yoga and your body quick and transformative!

These 4 key yoga poses for men will help you ease into a practice and ease into your body. Although they are relatively simple, they are deeply therapeutic as well as strength building. They will also work miracles for your flexibility. You can master them in the privacy of your living room AND I’ve set it up so you can do it all in 10 minutes at day! Check these out!

 

. Child’s Pose

man in Child's PoseThis pose is a low back saver and is the hunch reducer. Do it for your posture, do it for your pain, and do it because it feels so good.

Benefits: Child’s Pose lengthens the spine, assists the relief of lower back pain, and stretches your knees.

How to do it:

  • Kneel with your knees open shoulder-distance, with your toes touching.
  • Place your forehead on the floor.
  • Walk your hands forward with fanned fingers OR move hands behind you on the floor alongside your body.
  • Stay in this pose for 15 deep breaths through the nose.

High Lunge

Man in High Lunge

Here is a wonderful pose for runners and couch potatoes alike.

Benefits: High Lunge resurrects your leg strength and flexibility and fine tunes your core strength and balance. It’s also great for stretching muscles of the feet and toes.

How to do it:

  • Set up like a sprinter with your finger tips on the floor on either side of your lead foot. Your back foot has it’s toes curled under as if you’re going to run a race.
  • Alignment is key. Your front knee should be above your ankle and shouldn’t waver to the left or right. Keep that knee in line with your 2nd toe.
  • Your front thigh should be flat like a table and your butt is in line with that front knee. That means you may have to step back a few inches to get that thigh flat! If that’s difficult you may have to prop your hands up on books (or yoga blocks) or go high on your finger tips.
  • Press firmly through the back heal and look forward to lengthen your spine.
  • As this gets easier, transition from 5 fingers of a tented hand to 3 fingers, then one finger, and then, perhaps, shooting your hands behind you in the air or out to the side so your body looks like a cross.
  • Always draw the tummy in and try to lengthen your spine.
  • Breathe as deep as you can and see if you can stay for 5 to 20 breaths.

Crescent Pose

Man in Crescent Pose

Crescent is similar to the high lunge, but it refines more subtle strength and balance throughout the body, especially in the core and the legs.

Benefits: This pose goes deep into the hip flexors for extra strength and flexibility. It also strengthens and stretches the front of the legs.

How to do it:

  • Set up in the high lunge as above, but now the arms will reach straight in the air.
  • The torso is at “attention” and is straight with no back bend in the spine. Rooting down through the tail bone, draw the tummy in and try to gain length in the spine growing through the side ribs.
  • Stay here for 5 to 20 breaths.

Yogic Squat

Man in Squat

In India, they have chai and conversations sitting in a squat. Three quarters of the world goes to the toilet like this, and many ladies give birth like this. Most Westerners, however, have lost the ability to do a decent squat. Not good.

Benefits: This pose provides huge benefits for rehabilitating the flexibility in legs and knees. It also relieves constipation.

How to do it:

  • Feet should be shoulder-distance apart. Bend your knees so that your butt is as low as it can go without hitting the floor.
  • Try to get your heels flat. If this is impossible, curl up a towel or yoga mat to give you “ high heels.”
  • In your Squat, sit up tall with your hands in prayer on your heart with elbows pressing into the knees. For a variation, you can place hands on back of skull, drop head, and tuck chin into throat.
Start with these 4 tested and approved postures for only 10 minutes a day using deep breathing as you hold them. You will be amazed at how these poses will lead to small changes and transform your body in major ways.